Watching Sukkot—with Ardor and Faith

UPDATED — October, 5, 2017


 

I want to write a brief study to my brothers, sisters, and fellow watchmen out there, especially to those who are growing weary, those who are thinking of falling back asleep after so much has been revealed.

Not everyone is supposed to be a teacher, or an apostle, or a prophet, or a tongues-speaker (1 Cor. 12:28-31). However, ALL are commanded to pay attention to prophecy (2 Pet. 1:19) and to watch for the coming of the Lord Christ — “What I say to you, I say to everyone: ‘Watch!” (Mark 13:37)

My role is to help revive an ardor for prophecy. How Satan loves our neglect of it! How else have Christians become so indiscriminately comfortable in the Satanic paradise of this present age?

Whether a “high watch season” comes and goes, a good watchman stays awake. If God has commanded us to “watch,” then He will give us something to see. The only one who will be found asleep at the Lord’s coming is the servant who says, “My master is delayed in coming” (Luke 12:45), and drifts back to sleep. Those foolish Christians who are destined to grow dim and fall away will do so in times such as these, the last hour—even after the midnight cry! The true Church will faithfully continue to wait, watch, and believe.


 

~ Sukkot, 2017 ~
HIGH RAPTURE WATCH

 

LEVITICUS 23:39-43 — “On the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when you have gathered in the produce of the land, you shall celebrate the feast of the Lord seven days. On the first day shall be a solemn rest, and on the eighth day shall be a solemn rest. And you shall take on the first day the fruit of splendid trees, branches of palm trees and boughs of leafy trees and willows of the brook, and you shall rejoice before the Lord your God seven days. You shall celebrate it as a feast to the Lord for seven days in the year. It is a statute forever throughout your generations; you shall celebrate it in the seventh month. You shall dwell in booths for seven days. All native Israelites shall dwell in booths, that your generations may know that I made the people of Israel dwell in booths when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.”

The illustration of being liberated from Egypt to dwell in booths seems to be a picture of the Church raptured from the earth to dwell in heavenly chambers with new glorified bodies, or “booths” (tabernacles). Our body is a “tabernacle”, a temporary sanctuary — “…your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you…” (1 Cor. 6:19) — but we must put on new heavenly bodies.

“Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality.” (1 Cor. 15:51-53)

Note that Sukkot is the last of the 7 annual festivals, and thus the last time a ceremonial shofar (trumpet) is blown—according to Numbers 10:10, the trumpet is to be blown on ALL of the festivals — “…at your appointed feasts and at the beginnings of your months, you shall blow the trumpets…” — making Sukkot the “last trumpet” in sequence.

Sukkot begins with a harvest — “On the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when you have gathered the produce of the land…” — the harvest symbolizing a rapture on the first day of the festival.

It is then celebrated for 7 days — “…you shall celebrate the feast of the Lord seven days.” — which is a shadow of the redeemed Church celebrating in heaven during the 7-year tribulation on earth below.

They rejoice with palm branches in hand — “And you shall take on the first day the fruit of splendid trees, branches of palm trees and boughs of leafy trees and willows of the brook, and you shall rejoice before the Lord your God seven days.” This is a perfect parallel to the Church when it first appears in heaven in Revelation 7 just as wrath and tribulation begins on earth — “After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, ‘Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!” (Rev. 7:9-10)

This festival will begin Thursday, October 5, 2017. It is on the full moon. Being closest to the autumnal equinox, this full moon is known as a “harvest moon”, which only lands in October once every 3 years, usually in September. It’s also called a “travel moon”, “blood moon”, or “sanguine moon”.

The beginning of God’s wrath at the 6th seal of Revelation specifically details a full moon — “…the FULL moon became like blood…” The Greek word used here is “holos”, meaning “whole, complete”, specifically illustrating a full moon. It’s at the 6th seal that God’s wrath begins — “…the great day of their wrath has come…” (Rev. 6:17) — which is when the Church is raptured, and why the Church is rejoicing in heaven with palm branches… in the very next chapter!

Also, remember that in Mark 9, Jesus was transfigured on the mountain, and Elijah and Moses appeared with him. Then Peter said in verse 5, “Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents (Gr. “skēnas”—”booths, tabernacles”), one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” He said this because it was during the time of Sukkot, the Feast of Tabernacles. Sukkot is therefore foreshadowing the transfiguration of the Body of Christ, the Church’s final bodily transformation — “…we shall all be changed (Gr. “allassó”—”transformed”), in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed.” (1 Cor. 15:51-52) The Greek “allassó” (change, transform) has essentially the same meaning as “metamorphoó” (transfigure, transform) in Mark 9.

Compare all of this with Isaiah 26:19-21, and see it is a prophecy of the dead and living in Christ being raptured and entering heavenly chambers while God’s wrath begins on earth for 7 years — “Your dead shall live; their bodies shall rise. You who dwell in the dust, awake and sing for joy! For your dew is a dew of light, and the earth will give birth to the dead (Rev. 12, birth of the ‘male child’, the Church). Come, my people, enter your chambers, and shut your doors behind you; hide yourselves for a little while (7 years) until the fury has passed by (God’s wrath, great tribulation). For behold, the Lord is coming out from his place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity…”

What “chambers” does the Church enter to hide during God’s 7-year wrath? John 14:2 — “In my Father’s house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you?”

Psalm 27:5 — “For he will hide me in his shelter (Heb. “Sok”—”tabernacle”) in the day of trouble (Rev. 3:10, ‘I will keep you from the *hour of trial* that is coming on the whole world’); he will conceal me under the cover of his tent (Heb. “ohel”—”tent, booth”); he will lift me high upon a rock.”


 

Another interesting thing to look at is its possible connection to the “last day” mentioned by Jesus throughout John 6. Martha connected this “last day” with the resurrection in John 11:24 — “I know he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day.” And in John 12:48, Jesus brings it up again — “The one who rejects me and does not receive my words has a judge; the word that I have spoken will judge him on the last day.”

But in John 6, during a single speech, Jesus mentions the last day 4 times.

JOHN 6:39-40 — “And this is the will of him who sent me, that I shall lose none of all that he has given me, but raise them up at the last day. For my Father’s will is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.”

JOHN 6:44 — “No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him, and I will raise him up at the last day.”

JOHN 6:54 — “Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day.”

4 times in 1 speech along the shores of Capernaum, He phrases it the same way — “the last day.” There are many ways to express this, but He chooses a saying as curious and enigmatic as this. What last day? The last day of the world? Of the age? I think we’re meant to stir over these questions.

Seeking an answer from the immediate text, we find something interesting in the very next chapter, John 7. Right after Jesus finished His speech along the Capernaum shores in Galilee, we are told that it was at this time that Sukkot was about to begin — “After this Jesus went about in Galilee. He would not go about in Judea, because the Jews were seeking to kill him. Now the Jews’ Feast of Booths (Sukkot) was at hand.” (John 7:1-3) …That’s very interesting. Even more interesting is what we’re told about the festival in the coming verses — “On the last and greatest day of the feast (Sukkot), Jesus stood and said in a loud voice, ‘If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink.” (John 7:37)

Huh… So, right after Jesus says—4 times in 1 speech—that the redemption of the Church occurs on “the last day”, the Feast of Sukkot begins and we’re told that the festival’s 8th day is “the last and greatest day of the feast”. This seems comparable to Paul’s description of the rapture occurring “at the last trumpet” (1 Cor. 15:52), which may refer to one of the festivals in which trumpets are blown—likely the last festival of the year, Sukkot.

Could the “last and greatest day” of Sukkot be the “last day” of the Church?

After all, the 8th and final day of Sukkot is a solemn rest — “On the first day shall be a solemn rest, and on the eighth day shall be a solemn rest.” (Lev. 23:39) The 8th day of Sukkot is also a solemn assembly — “They kept the feast seven days, and on the eighth day there was a solemn assembly, according to the rule.” (Neh. 8:18)

There’s something very special about that final 8th day of Sukkot. It is the very last festival day of the year, the very last trumpet blown, and the last solemn assembly, and the greatest day of the festival.

Food for thought.


 

I think Sukkot probably points more to the rapture of the Church than any other festival.

Please dig deeper with this astounding study on the topic from a well-studied watchman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBPivey-t9g

 

Hope and faith be with the Bride!

 

 

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